John Philpin

With all the shenanigans over the pond ( actually that doesn’t help - no matter which side of ‘the pond’ you are on - shenanigans are occurring on ‘the other side’. ) So, to be clear, I have recently found myself being asked about my thoughts on Brexit by my American friends - and at the end of the conversation I point them at this article I wrote a while back.

More often than not, they come back to me asking about the ‘govt representation’ in the UK that I touch on in the piece. That is the people that on the whole voted for Brexit - the English outside of London - have no specific representation.

Let’s see if these photos help:

This is where the Northern Irish Parliament is housed:

This is where the Scottish Parliament is housed:

This is where the London ‘Parliament’ is housed:

These are two of the buildings were the Welsh Assembly is housed:

Surely you ask …. isn’t this the English Parliament?

No - that is ‘The Palace of Westminster’ which ‘serves as the meeting place of the House of Commons and the House of Lords, the two houses of the Parliament of the United Kingdom.’

As for England … well (from Wikipedia - my bold)

‘After the Treaty of Union in 1707, Acts of Parliament passed in the Parliament of England and the Parliament of Scotland created a new Kingdom of Great Britain and dissolved both parliaments, replacing them with a new Parliament of Great Britain based in the former home of the English parliament. The Parliament of Great Britain later became the Parliament of the United Kingdom in 1801 when the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland was formed through the Act of Union 1800.

Bottom line - the English have had no government specifically for themselves since 1707. Which until the end of the last century was just fine, all the ‘countries in the country’ were in the same boat. But then it all changed - under the watchful eye of Tony Bliar (sic) and his personal ‘Rumsfeld’ - Gordon Brown.

The three other ‘countries that make up the country’ were granted their own controlling government (in one form or the other) around 20 years ago:

  • Scotland : 1999
  • Wales : 1998
  • N. Ireland : 1999 (at least the latest variation)
  • London : 2000 (again the latest variation)

… all under the watchful eye of ‘Tone’ (Deaf).

Interesting to also note that since then we even had a Scottish Prime Minister for ‘The UK’ in the form of our very own aforementioned Gordon Brown.

Talk about disenfranchisement!